26th Annual Latinx Graduation

Registration is now open for the Office for Institutional Diversity and Equity’s 26th Annual Latinx Graduation. Planned by students and faculty from DePaul’s Center for Latino Research, the graduation ceremony is a chance to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of Latino students. The event will be held on Thursday, May 26 at 5:00 in LPSC Room 120 A/B or over Zoom. If you would like to attend the event in person, register by May 19th. If you would like to speak at the ceremony, send in a 400-650 word copy of your speech to latinxgraduation@depaul.edu for consideration. For more information, visit their official page.


TEDxDePaul: Carlos Roqués

After having to cancel the event in 2020 and streaming it virtually in 2021, TEDxDePaul is making a triumphant in-person return this year! For six years, DePaul has hosted its own TED event where current students, alumni, and staff are chosen to present on a pre-decided theme. The theme for 2022’s TEDxDepaul is “Metamorphosis”.

Selected to speak this year are six representatives of the DePaul community demonstrating diversity in ages, occupations, and academic pursuits. Among this year’s speakers is Carlos Roqués, a current sophomore in DePaul’s Honors Program. I reached out to Carlos to ask him about his preparation process and what he anticipates for the event.


What’s your year and major at DePaul? Do you have a double-major or minor that you’re pursuing?

“I am a sophomore Animation major with a minor in philosophy.”

How did you hear about the DePaul TEDx event and what persuaded you to apply?

“I was home during winter break and saw it pop on my DePaul Newsline feed, with nothing else to do I figured I’d apply.”

Without giving too much away, what are you planning to discuss and present at the convention?

“My presentation revolves around the animation industry; where it came from, where it is, and where it’s going. But also, the impact it’s had on my life, and why I believe it is such an influential art medium.”

What does the theme “metamorphosis” mean to you and how does it connect to your topic? Why do you feel that this is prescient to our current moment?

“Metamorphosis is essential to life; we are all a result of the changes we’ve undergone. My talk examines the metamorphosis animation has gone through and how I believe it should change in the future, but also my own personal metamorphosis as a result of my upbringing surrounded by cartoons.”

 Have any of your experiences in the Honors program been helpful in the preparation process for TEDx? Do you feel like, through this experience, you’re gaining skills that will be applicable to your future?

“Many of the Honors classes I’ve taken have given me a much deeper understanding of topics and issues that would have otherwise never had occurred to me. A standout was Philosophical Inquiry with Prof. Walker, it opened my eyes to the global struggle for equality and the colonial roots of Western hegemony. Honors classes have made me a much stronger writer, which has helped in the process of creating this TED talk. I am confident that these courses will have prepared me for entering the entertainment industry.”

What do you hope to get out of this experience and what do you hope your audience walks away with?

“I’m just hoping to just create some positive dialogue and that the audience walks away with a greater appreciation for animation.”

What are you excited about? Nervous?

“So incredibly nervous! But excited to get up on stage and have some fun.”

Would you suggest participating in TEDx to future Honors students? What advice would you give them?

“I encourage all Honors students to apply next year! My advice would be to find something you’re truly passionate about and take a stand on it, or reveal something no one has thought about yet. Be creative and be yourself.”


Thanks so much to Carlos for answering our questions! If you want to hear Carlos and other members of the DePaul community speak at TEDxDePaul, visit the official website


DART Careers in Community Organizing 

Direct Action and Research Training (DART) is holding an online info session on Wednesday, April 13 at 6 pm EDT / 5 pm CDT to discuss careers in community organizing. All DePaul students and alumni welcome, particularly those graduating by December 2022. Sign up at www.thedartcenter.org/rsvp

DART trains professional organizers and community organizations how to work for social, economic and racial justice, including:
* Holding police departments accountable
* Shutting down the school-to-prison pipeline
* Reining in predatory lenders
* Expanding access to primary health and dental care
* Prioritizing funding for affordable housing and job training
* Fighting for immigrants’ rights

Associate Community Organizer positions start August 8, 2022 and January 16, 2023 in cities below.
Starting salary $42,500-$44,000 + benefits.
Florida: Bradenton, Daytona Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Lakeland, Miami, Pensacola, Sarasota, St. Petersburg
Kansas: Kansas City
South Carolina: Columbia, Greenville
Virginia: Charlottesville, Richmond

Lead Community Organizer positions start summer 2022 in cities below. Starting salary $50,000-$70,000 + benefits.
Florida: Melbourne, Fort Myers 
Kansas: Wichita
Nebraska: Lincoln

DART organizations are diverse coalitions including many low- and moderate-income, minority and immigrant communities. They strongly encourage people from these backgrounds, as well as fluent Spanish speakers and DACA recipients, to apply. To apply or learn more about DART, visit www.thedartcenter.org and find us on instagram and facebook @theDARTcenter. Still have questions? Contact hannah@thedartcenter.org or 202.841.0353.

Reflecting on the 2022 Honors Ball

As I’m sure everyone in the Honors program is aware, after weeks of hype-building and email-sending, the Honors Student Government hosted this year’s Honors Ball last Friday, April 8th. This was the first Honors Ball to be held since the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, breaking a two-year absence. For many in HSG, myself included, this was their very first time planning or attending an Honors Ball. 2019’s Honors Ball, themed “Monochromatic Disco”, was all but a forgotten memory.

Thus tasked with planning the ball, and thereby reintroducing it to Honors students, HSG wanted to go all out. It would be the social event to end all HSG social events. This Honors Ball would be the biggest of all, and it would mark a triumphant return to in-person gatherings and celebrations. But with many of us not having any sense of the framework for an Honors Ball, we worried that this might prove to be a daunting task.

HSG’s homemade photo-op

As this past Friday demonstrated, however, our fears were unfounded. The number of people in attendance outnumbered those who RSVP’d for the event, exceeding 100 people in total. This is by far the greatest turnout HSG has seen for any of its social events this year and blows past Honors Ball attendance out of the waters. If we were intent on redefining the Honors Ball, then I’d say we achieved our goal. Students arrived fully decked out in old prom dresses and tuxedos, fitting perfectly with the “Night on the Red Carpet” theme of the event. They sang and danced through the night, notably communing in a group rendition of Olivia Rodrigo’s “good 4 u” that I was lucky enough to witness from a bird’s eye view.

This event of course could never have taken place without the help of the Honors faculty and the Chartwell’s staff who helped cater and set up the event. The 2022 Honor’s Ball was a collaborative experience, and I’d like to acknowledge the planning and work that went into the event–from the managers of Cortelyou Commons to Blue Demon Theatre (who so generously donated their lights to us). Thank you everyone for attending and helping out with the event! May next year’s ball rise up to meet this one (and I’m sure that it will)!

Our lovely e-board thanks you for coming!

If you have any photos from the Honors Ball that you’d like to share, either contact us at dpuhonorsblog@gmail.com or send them to the Honorable Mentions team at hsgnewsletter@gmail.com


Speaker Event with Andrea Cilliers

Hello Honors students and staff,

The Honors Program is having its first co-sponsored speaker event of the Spring Quarter this Thursday, April 14th. Presented by DePaul’s Center for Students with Disabilities, the Career Center, A4, and the School of Public Service, guest Andrea Cilliers will be coming to speak about her experience working in the federal government and provide guidance for anyone interested in pursuing a similar career. Cilliers is currently the Disability Program Manager for the U.S State Department, so this is a great chance for students with a passion for disability rights and public policy to learn about the field and possible career tracks.

The event will be held over Zoom on April 14th at 7:00 PM CST.

Visit here to register for this event


What is Honors Distinction?

In my previous post explaining Honors Points and what they mean, I mentioned that these points can help students along the pathway to Honors Distinction. But what exactly is Honors Distinction, and why should anyone work towards it? Much like my last post seeking to “demystify Honors”, I hope that this post will answer some basic questions about the Honors Program’s various opportunities.


Honors Distinction is a 3-Tiered Title

In order for an Honors student to achieve Honors Distinction, that student must first meet these three qualifications:

Honors Partnership

Partnership is the first step students can take towards achieving Honors Distinction. Students can earn Honors Partnership by accumulating 10 Honors Points through attending various Honors events and participating in Honors activities. As a partner, students then have the chance to run for Honors Student Government or to work in the Honors office. Partners can also present their work at the annual Honors Conference.

Honors Leadership

Leadership is the second step students can take towards achieving Honors Distinction. To receive this title, a student must serve in a leadership position in the Honors program. This can be as an HSG officer, an Honorable Mentions editor, an Honors employee, or an Honors mentor. Students are automatically eligible for leadership positions after earning Partnership and can run for office in the Spring of each year. See our current list of board members here.


Honors Scholarship

Honors Scholarship is the third and final step to reaching Honors Distinction. A student reaches Honors Scholarship after either presenting a paper at the Honors Student Conference or by completing a senior thesis. Students do not need to have obtained Leadership as a prerequisite for earning a Scholarship, but they will need to have earned Partnership.

What are the benefits of earning Honors Distinction?

Only a small portion of Honors students, between 5-10%, graduate each year with Distinction. To have earned Distinction on top of completing the rigorous Honors curriculum is an extraordinary feat. At graduation, students who have earned Honors Distinction wear a unique cord along with the standard Honors cord, and they are individually celebrated at the Senior Gala. The Honors Program is a chance for high-achieving and ambitious students to work alongside and form meaningful relationships with a large team of in-field professionals and student peers. Students who go above and beyond in participating in the Honors community are making the most of their experience and helping to build a flourishing academic community.


Honorable Mentions Winter Quarter 2022

The latest edition of Honorable Mentions, the quarterly Honors newsletter, has officially arrived! This quarter’s issue introduces the program’s newest academic advisor, talks about what Honors Student Government has been up to behind the scenes, and gives some fun suggestions for the goings-on in the city! As always, huge kudos to newsletter editors and designers Julia Matuszek and Ben Stumpe as well as to all of the students who contributed!



Ninth Annual Honors Student Conference

We encourage students to submit their best Honors paper from fall quarter, 2021, or winter quarter, 2022, to be considered for inclusion in the Honors Student Conference.

Select a paper you are proud of and that you wish to share with others in the university community. Paper lengths will vary, but 7-15 pages would be a standard expectation for your submission.  Students may submit one paper completed in an Honors course for conference consideration.

Benefits of participation:

·         Learn to present academic work in a formal setting

·         Gain important exposition skills that will be valuable for graduate school or work in your future profession

·         Receive feedback from faculty and scholars in your field

·         Exchange ideas with other undergraduate students

·         Enhance your resume with authentic and meaningful experience

·         Earn “Honors Scholarship,” one of the three steps toward achieving “Honors Distinction”

The deadline for conference submission is Monday, April 11.

If you have questions, email Nancy at ngrossma@depaul.edu.

We look forward to seeing your work!

The Honors Program Staff