Delicious Pandemic Resolutions

Author: Erin Henze 

The pandemic has halted many things over the last 10 months, but many people are still attempting to carry on with one tradition that always accompanies the start of a new year: New Year’s Resolutions.  We all know that it can be difficult to hold true to our resolutions for an extended period of time, regardless of what our promises may be.  If your resolution for 2021 includes striving for a healthier and more energetic you, look no further than these nutritious recipes that are sure to satisfy your cravings!

Fudge Brownies

These brownies are my absolute favorite dessert! You honestly aren’t even able to tell the difference between these and any store-bought brownie mix. These treats are significantly lower in sugar and fat than your traditional brownie, so you won’t feel guilty for eating more than one (or the entire pan). 

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine ¼ cup flour, ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder, and ¼ tsp salt. Microwave melt ½ cup chocolate chips and 2 tablespoons of butter. Mix in ¼ cup sugar, ¼ cup brown sugar, ¾ cup non-fat Greek yogurt, 2 eggs, and 1 tablespoon vanilla extract. Combine wet and dry ingredients, and pour into a greased pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes and enjoy warm!

Edible Cookie Dough

Do you have a bad habit of eating raw cookie dough from the bowl any time you make cookies? Yeah, me too. But with this recipe, eating raw “cookie dough” won’t leave you with an upset stomach or guilty conscience! I like to enjoy this with pretzels, graham crackers, or by the spoonful. 

  • Add 1 can rinsed and drained chickpeas, ¼ cup peanut butter, ¼ cup oats, ¼ tsp baking powder, ¼ tsp cinnamon, 1 tablespoon honey, 2 tablespoons maple syrup, 1 tablespoon brown sugar, 1 tablespoon vanilla, and a handful of chocolate chips to a blender or food processor. Blend until combined and refrigerate until chilled. 

Berry Cheesecake Smoothie

Craving both a milkshake and a nice, hearty slice of cheesecake? Look no further than this smoothie. It is the perfect combination of sweet and savory, and will certainty satisfy your every desire without the added fat and sugar. 

  • Combine 1 (5.3oz) container of flavored Greek yogurt, 2 tablespoons low-fat cottage cheese, ½ cup unsweetened almond milk or water, 1 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder, 1 cup any variety berries, fresh or frozen,a dn 1 cup ice cubes in a food processor or blender. Blend until fully combined and desired consistency is reached. Top with granola or enjoy plain!

Meals and Snacks to Get You Through Finals Week!

Author: Morris McLennan

               Finals week is here. I don’t know about anybody else, but I know I’m certainly operating at about 10% my usual brain capacity. Every morning I wake up and I check my New York Times daily email and I take fifty points of psychic damage. But of course, the one way to regain my lost brain points is by consuming health potions. And I am nothing if not a master craftsman of health potions. Here are my favorites.

  1. Soup / Chili

Soup is the king of psychic healing. I have made the Chickpea Noodle Soup recipe from America’s Test Kitchen’s vegan cookbook about five times. You can also just throw vegetables and water in a pot and see what happens! It will probably become soup.

I ate chili on election night. I used to not like chili because my parents, though I love them very much, are not skilled with seasonings. However, when you make chili yourself, you can put as much seasoning as you want in it. It’s also not very expensive to just throw beans and tomatoes and vegetables into a pot and then suddenly have enough food for a week. I would recommend a recipe but I honestly have never followed a chili recipe before. You don’t need instructions; you just need to cook with love.

  • Chocolate Chip Cookies

I have probably made more chocolate chip cookies than any other baked good. They heal my soul! They also remind me of all the times my dad made Tollhouse cookies when I was a little kid. Sometimes when I make the Tollhouse recipe, the nostalgia is too overwhelming and I end up crying about how much I miss making cookies with my dad. But usually I use this recipe instead: https://food52.com/recipes/39132-ovenly-s-secretly-vegan-salted-chocolate-chip-cookies

  • Pizza

If I ever get sentenced to death for jaywalking on North Clifton Avenue, I’m ordering Dimo’s Pizza for my last meal. I love Chicago but I simply think the pizza here is soggy and a little flavorless. But not Dimo’s! The vegan deep dish from Kitchen17 is also pretty good though. Anyways, I know none of us are cooking every single meal from scratch. That’s a lot of effort for a busy student. So I don’t know about you, but I’m going to order pizza.


All the Cookbooks I’ve Checked Out from the Library Over Quarantine (So Far)

Author: Morris McLennan

I don’t remember how this started. I believe my roommates and I were having a good laugh about mobsters. Perhaps it was around the time we were planning to marathon all the Godfather movies? I can’t say I’m entirely sure. What I do know is this: my life was forever changed after going to the library and checking out The Wise Guy Cookbook: My Favorite Recipes From My Life as a Goodfella to Cooking on the Run by Henry Hill.  What started as a joke has turned into my favorite quarantine activity of all time. I browse the internet for cookbooks, then instead of buying them like some kind of billionaire, I check them out from the library and cook through a few of the recipes before returning them. 

For context, I have been cooking and baking consistently for three years now. I’m no five-star chef, but I do have a lot of experience reading and following recipes. Unfortunately, my opinion is not objectively true, and all of my reviews will be based on my opinion. Many cookbooks are hard to compare, so please don’t take this as anything other than silly college entertainment writing. But without further ado, here are my reviews.

The Wise Guy Cookbook: My Favorite Recipes From My Life as a Goodfella to Cooking on the Run by Henry Hill

Henry. The man who started it all. I’ve never seen Goodfellas, but I promise I’ll watch it eventually. Henry Hill is apparently one of the mobsters that movie was about. As for the cookbook, his stories are the best part. First I made his stuffed shells with tomato mint sauce, but I used store-bought vegan mozzarella and homemade tofu ricotta instead of cow cheese. I don’t think that’s how Henry would’ve wanted me to make it, but it turned out pretty good, and I’ll definitely make them again sometime. I also made a sun-dried tomato pasta sauce, which was fine, but not awesome. That being said, this is a great cookbook to read cover to cover. There are stories all about the recipes and where they come from. It’s organized not by breakfast, lunch, and dinner, or even by seasons; Henry Hill’s cookbook follows his life on the run! 

My Rating: 4 Stars

Food52 Vegan: 60 Vegetable-Driven Recipes for Any Kitchen by Gena Hamshaw

I love the Food52 website. I love the Food52 YouTube channel. I guzzle Food52 recipes like I’m a very dehydrated person and they are water. Gena Hamshaw is the queen of Food52 vegan recipes. I own her other cookbook, Power Plates, so I was excited to give this one a try. However, many of the Food52 Vegan recipes are copies of the recipes that appear in Power Plates. Many of the recipes looked sort of basic and boring to me. It’s a nice cookbook, and there’s plenty of pictures, but you’re probably better off just looking at the recipes online. I tried the date nut bread, and it was okay, but I don’t love dates all that much. 

My Rating: 2 Stars

The Jewish Cookbook by Leah Koeing

I checked out this book with the intention of learning how to make hamantaschen. I have not leaned how to make hamantaschen yet. However, I still have a few days left on my loan, and Lori Lightfoot can’t take my money if I return it a few days late. What makes The Jewish Cookbook so special is the massive quantity of recipes and information it contains. Jewish food exists basically all over the planet, so there are tons of regional dishes and variations on recipes. The Jewish Cookbook also contains stories about many of the recipes; I know I learned a lot while flipping through it. The only recipe I’ve made so far is braised fennel, and it was very solid, but I also discovered that I don’t really like fennel that much. 

My Rating: 4 Stars

PLANTLAB by Matthew Kenney

Maybe I should not be reviewing this cookbook since I haven’t made any recipes from it, but I feel like it would be dishonest of me not to tell you what happened. What happened, you ask? I checked this cookbook out from the library, looked at it for five minutes, and then returned it. I do not want to make meals that are essentially just raw or cooked vegetables with no source of… anything remotely satiating. This is a cookbook for people who want to make tiny fancy restaurant foods. Also many of the recipes were for raw foods, which I have no personal disrespect for, I simply do not consider them high on my list of foods I want to make. 

My Rating: 1 Star

Black Girl Baking: Wholesome Recipes Inspired by a Soulful Upbringing by Jerrelle Guy

When Food52 released a video on Jerrelle Guy’s kombucha muffins, I thought… no way. Then I made them, and I thought ‘this is unlike anything I’ve ever made before; I wonder if more recipes like this exist?’ Then I learned that Jerrelle Guy has a cookbook. And it is amazing. I am a whole grain fanboy. I am an alternative flours fanboy. I am a vegan baked goods fanboy. This cookbook has brought so much joy into my life. I made the almond coconut croissants and they brought a tear to my eye. I have like ten bookmarks on the recipes I want to make. I must admit that I did severely mess up the apple crisp recipe, and ended up with something both burnt and raw at the same time, but that was probably on me. The croissants changed my life and I will be buying this cookbook once I return the library copy. 

My Rating: 4.5 Stars

Those are all my cookbook reviews so far! If you’re familiar with any of these cookbooks and have opinions, I would love to hear them. I’m also open to any suggestions for more cookbooks I should check out in the future.   Email me at: cmclenna@depaul.edu